Published by the Center for the Study of The Great Ideas (founded in 1990 by Mortimer J. Adler and Max Weismann)
In association with the The Adler-Aquinas Institute and Aquinas School of Leadership
A Founding Member of the Alliance for Liberal Learning

Friday, December 14, 2018

Mortimer Adler’s Greatest Idea: Teaching Kids How to Think

The latest issue/s of the Center’s weekly, The Great Ideas Online (No. 973), discussed this article by Susan Walton, published in Education Week October 5, 1981.

TGIO is emailed to members.

At the Center’s website you’ll find information on how to Become a Member.

#education

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Remembering Bill Siegel

The Great Books Foundation on the death earlier today of a long-time member of its staff.

"Bill was great with teachers and kids. He was a passionate supporter of close reading and dynamic discussion. ...

"Bill brought his filmmaking expertise to us as well, helping us create many videos that showed teachers and kids discussing great stories. ..."

At the Chicago Tribune, this report, Bill Siegel, Oscar-nominated Chicago documentary filmmaker behind 'Weather Underground,' has died.

#education

The Religious Imagination of T.S. Eliot

"Russell [Kirk} was invited to Hillsdale College to delivery this address at a conference on Christianity and Literature June 26, 1988. He was introduced by Dr. Michael Bauman."

#art #religion

Sunday, December 9, 2018

What Happened to the Great Ideas

The latest issue/s of the Center’s weekly, The Great Ideas Online (No. 972), discussed this article by John Berlau on the then-recent death of Mortimer Adler, originally published in Insight on the News, Volume 17, Issue 32, August 27, 2001.

TGIO is emailed to members.

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#idea #MortimerAdler

Friday, December 7, 2018

Dante and the Blessed Virgin

Curtis L. Hancock reviewed Dante and the Blessed Virgin (2010), by Ralph McInerny, at The Maritain Notebook, American Maritain Association

#art #good

Thursday, December 6, 2018

How to Spread the Wealth

Anthony B. Atkinson on "Practical Policies for Reducing Inequality" at Foreign Affairs

#equality #wealth

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Can a Christian Philosophy Exist?

Peter A. Redpath recently presented this lecture [audio] at Paradise Valley Community College, Phoenix, Arizona

#philosophy #religion

Is Democracy Good for the Poor?

Michael Ross at the American Journal of Political Science

#democracy #equality #wealth

Friday, November 30, 2018

Three Thinkers: Adler, Simon, and Maritain

The latest issues of the Center’s weekly, The Great Ideas Online (Nos. 969-971), discussed these recollections by Donald A. Gallagher.

TGIO is emailed to members.

At the Center’s website you’ll find information on how to Become a Member.

#philosophy #MortimerAdler

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Homer Gets a Tax Cut

Larry M. Bartels on "Inequality and Public Policy in the American Mind", published in Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 3, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 15-31.

(via Adam Berinsky)

#equality #wealth

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

The Great Books: Enemies of Wisdom

Not everyone's a fan.

For example, Frederick Wilhelmsen, originally published at Modern Age (Summer/Fall 1987), republished at The Imaginative Conservative.

#education

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Why Hasn't Democracy Slowed Rising Inequality?

Adam Bonica, Nolan McCarty, Keith T. Poole, and Howard Rosenthal at the Journal of Economic Perspectives.

#democracy #equality #wealth

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Aquinas Leadership International Update - November 2018

From Peter A. Redpath, "I write to update you about some developments related to the Aquinas Leadership International (ALI) group, our affiliate organizations, and other groups interested in ALI’s work. ..."
 WITH GREAT SADNESS, WE WISH TO INFORM OUR READERS OF THE DEATH OF OUR COLLEAGUE
HERBERT I. LONDON
ON 11 NOVEMBER 2018
FOR DETAILS ABOUT HERB'S PASSING, PLEASE SEE THE FOLLOWING LINKS:

SIXTH ANNUAL AQUINAS LEADERSHIP INTERNATIONAL WORLD CONGRESS
CALL FOR PAPERS AND PANEL PROPOSALS
Topic: “How, If in Any Way, are Metaphysics, Ethics, Cultural Leadership, and Politics Essentially Related?”

Dates: Thursday Evening, 02 May 2019–Saturday Evening, 04 May 2019
Location: Paradise Valley Community College, Phoenix, Arizona and Spirit in the Desert Retreat Center, Carefree, Arizona
Congress Details: If you are interested in presenting a paper or organizing a panel at this World Congress, ASAP, please contact Congress Chair Peter Redpath at:
peterredpath@aquinasschoolofleadership.com
Special Note: A few, multiple-occupancy (up to 3 persons), rooms have been reserved at the Spirit in the Desert Retreat Center.
If you plan to participate in this event and stay at the Retreat Center, you should let the Congress
Chair know this NOW.

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Schools brief on liberalism

At The Economist, The brains trust: The ideas of liberalism’s greatest thinkers; And why they still matter.

The father of liberalism: Against the tyranny of the majority John Stuart Mill's warning still resonates today.

De Tocqueville and the French exception: The gloomiest of the great liberals worried that democracy might not be compatible with liberty.

Was John Maynard Keynes a liberal? People should be free to choose. It was their freedom not to choose that troubled him.

The exiles fight back: Hayek, Popper and Schumpeter formulated a response to tyranny. Their lives and reputations diverged, but their ideas were rooted in the traumas of their shared birthplace.

Three post-war liberals strove to establish the meaning of freedom: Berlin, Rawls and Nozick put their faith in the sanctity of the individual.

The prophets of illiberal progress: Rousseau, Marx and Nietzsche. Terrible things have been done in their name.

Friday, November 23, 2018

Proust's longest sentence

...in the original French, an English translation, and diagrammed, at Quora.

#art #language

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Fighting Poverty in the U.S. and Europe: A World of Difference

Presentation on this book by Alberto Alesina and Edward L. Glaeser at the World Bank.

#equality #wealth

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Readers of the world unite

Review essay by Jonathan Wolff on

  • A World to Win: The life and work of Karl Marx, by Sven-Erik Liedman, translated by Jeffrey N. Skinner
  • Marx and Marxism, by Gregory Claeys
  • Why Marx was Right, by Terry Eagleton
  • The Communist Manifesto, by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, adapted by Martin Rowson
at The Times Literary Supplement

#equality #government

Friday, November 9, 2018

Great Books, Democracy, And Truth

The latest issues of the Center’s weekly, The Great Ideas Online (Nos. 967-968), discussed this essay by Mortimer Adler from 1977, as supplemented and included in his book Reforming Eductation (1988).

TGIO is emailed to members.

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#democracy #education #truth

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

The Spirit of Comedy in Plato

William Chase Greene in Harvard Studies in Classical Philology

"Even when the world was young, the philosopher had the reputation of being an unpractical star-gazer who had little in common with his fellowmen. Search the indices of Plato, and you will find no imputation of wit, humor, or satire. The uninitiated will suppose that Plato was as solemn as the rest of the tribe. Yet several clues might save us at the start from so capital an error."

(Thanks to Jay Gold)

#art #philosophy

Monday, October 29, 2018

Mark Twain, eccentric

"Daniel Karlin considers the difficulties in dealing with an American classic" in a review essay at The Times Literary Supplement.

#art

Sunday, October 28, 2018

A Debate on the Great Books Program

No: Not Without Socrates, by Ben Ray Redman;

Yes: Bootstraps of Free Man, by Raymond H. Wittcoff;

at The Saturday Review, December 9, 1950

#education

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Guns Germs And Steel

National Geographic adaptation of Jared Diamond's book:

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies is a 1997 transdisciplinary nonfiction book by Jared Diamond, professor of geography and physiology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). In 1998, it won the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction and the Aventis Prize for Best Science Book. A documentary based on the book, and produced by the National Geographic Society, was broadcast on PBS in July 2005.

The book attempts to explain why Eurasian civilizations (including North Africa) have survived and conquered others, while arguing against the idea that Eurasian hegemony is due to any form of Eurasian intellectual, moral, or inherent genetic superiority. Diamond argues that the gaps in power and technology between human societies originate in environmental differences, which are amplified by various positive feedback loops. When cultural or genetic differences have favored Eurasians (for example, written language or the development among Eurasians of resistance to endemic diseases), he asserts that these advantages occurred because of the influence of geography on societies and cultures, and were not inherent in the Eurasian genomes.

Part 1 of 3 at YouTube;

Part 2 of 3 at YouTube;

Part 3 of 3 at YouTube.

#equality #wealth

Friday, October 26, 2018

A Man of Ideas: The Legacy of Mortimer Adler

The latest issue/s of the Center’s weekly, The Great Ideas Online (No. 966), discussed this essay by Andrew Svenning.

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#MortimerAdler

Friday, October 19, 2018

God and Modern Man

The latest issues of the Center’s weekly, The Great Ideas Online (Nos. 963-965), discussed this lecture by Mortimer Alder presented at Aspen in August 1966.

TGIO is emailed to members.

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#being #god