Published by the Center for the Study of The Great Ideas (founded in 1990 by Mortimer J. Adler and Max Weismann)
In association with the The Adler-Aquinas Institute and Aquinas School of Leadership
A Founding Member of the Alliance for Liberal Learning

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

The Greeks, the West, and World Culture

The latest issues, Nos. 951-52, of The Great Ideas Online, the Center's weekly, discussed this presentation by Mortimer J. Adler in Athens, Greece, September 1981.

TGIO is emailed to members.

At the Center’s website you’ll find information on how to Become a Member.

#philosophy

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Why did it take so long?

The latest issue of The Great Ideas Online, the Center's weekly, discussed Mortimer Adler on "long persistent denial or misunderstanding of the truth that all human beings are by nature equal."

TGIO is emailed to members.

At the Center’s website you’ll find information on how to Become a Member.

#equality

Friday, June 29, 2018

Aquinas Leadership International Update - Late June/July 2018

Dr. Peter Redpath emails the latest:

With Great Sadness We Report the Recent Death of Our Colleague 

Eric McLuhan

For Some Details about Eric's Life and Death, see: 


Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress

20 to 22 July 2018

Immaculate Conception Seminary

Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA

  • Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress Topic
The chief topic for the ALI 20 to 22 July 2018, 5th annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress at the Immaculate Conception Seminary in Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA, will be:
“Artificial Intelligence and the Futures of Philosophy, Global Leadership, and World Peace”
 This World Congress will celebrate the following 7 anniversaries:
10th Anniversary of the founding of the International Étienne Gilson Society (IEGS) at a meeting sponsored by Civitas Christiana, Warsaw, Poland
10th Anniversary of the death of Mieczysław Albert Maria Krąpiec, O.P.
40th Anniversary of the death of Étienne Gilson
50th Anniversary of publication of Jacques Maritain's Peasant of the Garonne
70th Anniversary of founding of the State of Israel
100th Anniversary of the end of World War I
200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankensteinor the Modern Prometheus
This World Congress especially welcomes individual papers, or panels, that relate works of the above-mentioned individuals to the Congress main topic.
If you would like to co-sponsor this meeting and/or prepare a paper related to the Congress topic, by 08 July 2018, contact the Congress Chair, Peter Redpath at: peterredpath@aquinasschoolofleadership.com.
Preparation of the Congress program has already started. Once again, our program is shaping up to generate a great meeting!
The Aquinas Leadership International group is pleased to announce that the American Maritain Association will join our already-existing co-sponsors to help host this meeting!


Thursday, June 28, 2018

Adler in the University of Chicago Law School centennial bibliography

This long listing is alphabetical by author and Dr. Adler's works are on pages 9-10, at Chicago Unbound.

The University of Chicago Law School: A Century of Scholarship. A Bibliography of Writings of the Faculty of the University of Chicago from 1902-2002
D'Angelo Law Library
Publication Date 2002

Abstract
A Bibliography to commemorate the Law School's Centennial in 2002.

Recommended Citation
D'Angelo Law Library, "The University of Chicago Law School: A Century of Scholarship. A Bibliography of Writings of the Faculty of the University of Chicago from 1902-2002" (2002). Publications. 2.
http://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/lib_pubs/2

#education

Thursday, June 21, 2018

The Idea of Civil Police

The latest issues of The Great Ideas Online, the Centers weekly, discussed "The Idea of Civil Police", a presentation by Mortimer J. Adler at Aspen in February 1972.

TGIO is emailed to members.

At the Center’s website you’ll find information on how to Become a Member.

#government #law

Friday, June 8, 2018

The Defeat of Reason

Tim Maudlin reviews
What Is Real?: The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics, by Adam Becker, and
The Ashtray: (Or the Man Who Denied Reality), by Errol Morris,
at Boston Review.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Dreams of a Democratic Culture: Revising the Origins of the Great Books Idea, 1869–1921

Tim Lacy at The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

"British and American intellectuals began to formulate ideas about so-called great books from the mid-1800s to 1920. English critic Matthew Arnold's writings served as the fountainhead of ideas about the 'best' books. But rather than simply buttress the opinions of highbrow cultural elites, he also inspired those with dreams of a democratized culture. From Arnold and from efforts such as Sir John Lubbock's '100 Best Books,' the pursuit of the 'best' in books spread in both Victorian Britain and the United States. The phrase 'great books' gained currency in the midst of profound technical, cultural, educational, and philosophical changes. Victorian-era literature professors in America rooted the idea in both education and popular culture through their encouragements to read. Finally, the idea explicitly took hold on college campuses, first with Charles Mills Gayley at the University of California at Berkeley and then John Erskine's General Honors seminar at Columbia University."

#democracy #education

Friday, June 1, 2018

Do you have the right time?

"Samuel Graydon considers how popular science books can play ‘Virgil and Beatrice to our bewildered Dante’" in a review of

  • Special Relativity and Classical Field Theory: The theoretical minimum, by Leonard Susskind and Art Friedman
  • The Little Book of Black Holes, by Steven S. Gubser and Frans Pretorius
  • The Order of Time, by Carlo Rovelli
  • Conjuring the Universe: The origins of the laws of nature, by Peter Atkins
at The Times Literary Supplement,

#physics #time

Monday, May 28, 2018

A comparison of Adler's 'Paideia' and the traditional approaches in fine arts education of selected secondary schools

Doctoral dissertation by Gerald Ralph Luecht, Marquette University

"Abstract

Educational reform has become a favorite topic of conversation in many areas of society. Calls for change, accountability, practical education, back-to-the-basics, etc., are very common. However, no specific mention is made as to how fine arts education is to find a place after the demands of the 'basic curriculum' are met. Even though fine arts education is given some importance, the actual placement in the curriculum, except for a suggested one year requirement in some states, is relegated to an elective status. Mortimer Adler's Paideia Proposal makes fine arts education an integral part of the curriculum. The proposal is an updated version of his classicist views, but with more specific recommendations for the curriculum and teaching methods than found in his earlier works. Methodology. In order to illustrate the composition of Paideia and traditional programs, the following approach is utilized: (1) pertinent literature was examined and analyzed to point out basic philosophical beliefs (human nature, knowledge, and aesthetics) underlying Adler's and the traditional program in the fine arts, (2) two Paideia programs and selected typical traditional programs were examined (i.e., those representing nationwide trends) to determine the specific implementation of the fine arts programs, and (3) John Van Doren, the author of the fine arts section in the third Paideia book, was interviewed to gather information on the specifics of the general structure proposed in Paideia. Conclusion. Today's lack of interest in the fine arts might be a result of the fine arts establishment ignoring the general education students in the past. A population that is educated in the fine arts might be more interested in making sure that the fine arts remain in the curriculum, rather than in questioning their validity. Paideia's philosophy of the same education for all would alter the goals of fine arts education as it exists in traditional education at the present time. Since Paideia does not make any specific recommendations for scheduling, some suggestions are given in the Appendix.

Recommended Citation
Luecht, Gerald Ralph, "A comparison of Adler's "Paideia" and the traditional approaches in fine arts education of selected secondary schools" (1992). Dissertations (1962 - 2010) Access via Proquest Digital Dissertations. AAI9227128.
http://epublications.marquette.edu/dissertations/AAI9227128 "

#art #education

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Aquinas Leadership International Update Late May/Early June 2018

Dr. Peter A. Redpath sends this news of Aquinas Leadership International and other organizations.


ANNOUNCING THE
Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress
20 to 22 July 2018
Immaculate Conception Seminary
Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA

  • Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress Topic
The chief topic for the ALI 20 to 22 July 2018, 5th annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress at the Immaculate Conception Seminary in Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA, will be:
“Artificial Intelligence and the Futures of Philosophy, Global Leadership, and World Peace”
 This World Congress will celebrate the following 7 anniversaries:
10th Anniversary of the founding of the International Étienne Gilson Society (IEGS) at a meeting sponsored by Civitas Christiana, Warsaw, Poland
10th Anniversary of the death of Mieczysław Albert Maria Krąpiec, O.P.
40th Anniversary of the death of Étienne Gilson
50th Anniversary of publication of Jacques Maritain's Peasant of the Garonne
70th Anniversary of founding of the State of Israel
100th Anniversary of the end of World War I
200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankensteinor the Modern Prometheus
This World Congress especially welcomes individual papers, or panels, that relate works of the above-mentioned individuals to the Congress main topic.
If you would like to co-sponsor this meeting, prepare a paper, participate in, or organize, a panel related to this topic, contact the Congress Chair, Peter Redpath, at: peterredpath@aquinasschoolofleadership.com.

Preparation of the Congress program has already startedIndividual and panel presentations will be held all day Friday  and Saturdayand Sunday morning until 11:30 AMIf you have already had your paperor panelaccepted for the CongressASAP please contact Congress-Chair Peter Redpath at the e-mail address to indicate your day and time preference for presentation. If you want to apply to have a paper or panel accepted for the Congress, ASAP, contact Peter Redpath by email at peterredpath -at- aquinasschoolofleadership -dot- com
The Aquinas Leadership International group is pleased to announce that the American Maritain Association will join our already-existing co-sponsors to help host this meeting!

Friday, May 25, 2018

A Catechism for Revolutionaries

The latest issues of The Great Ideas Online, the Centers weekly, discussed this work by Mortimer Adler and John Deely.

TGIO is emailed to members.

At the Center’s website you’ll find information on how to Become a Member.

#revolution

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

The problem of hyper-liberalism

John Gray "on a new cult at odds with the progressives of the past" at the Times Literary Supplement.

"While student bodies have dedicated themselves to removing relics of the colonial era from public places, sections of the faculty have ganged up to denounce anyone who suggests that the legacy of empire is not one of unmitigated criminality. If he was alive today one of these dissident figures would be [Karl] Marx himself, who in his writings on India maintained that the impact of British imperialism was in some ways positive. ... Of course, Marx may have been mistaken in this judgement. ... But like other progressive thinkers at the time, he also took for granted that this was a question that could and should be debated. ...

"in a society of the sort [John Stuart] Mill envisioned, other religions and philos­ophies would be gradually eliminated. But if only one view of the world is acceptable, what becomes of intellectual diversity? This was not a theoretical risk for Mill. He found it exemplified in [Auguste] Comte, whose philosophy he came to believe led to 'liberticide' – the destruction of intellectual freedom that comes when everyone is required to hold the same view. A hostile critic of liberalism who valued free inquiry only insofar as it was useful in weeding out irrational beliefs, Comte welcomed the rise of an intellectual orthodoxy with the power to impose itself on society. Mill was horrified by the prospect. He could scarcely have imagined that such an orthodoxy would be developed and enforced by liberals not unlike himself."

[link fixed -ed.]

#equality #liberty

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Epigenetics: The Evolution Revolution

Israel Rosenfield and Edward Ziff at The New York Review of Books.

"Until the mid-1970s, no one suspected that the way in which the DNA was “read” could be altered by environmental factors, or that the nervous systems of people who grew up in stress-free environments would develop differently from those of people who did not. One’s development, it was thought, was guided only by one’s genetic makeup. As a result of epigenesis, a child deprived of nourishment may continue to crave and consume large amounts of food as an adult, even when he or she is being properly nourished, leading to obesity and diabetes. A child who loses a parent or is neglected or abused may have a genetic basis for experiencing anxiety and depression and possibly schizophrenia. Formerly, it had been widely believed that Darwinian evolutionary mechanisms—variation and natural selection—were the only means for introducing such long-lasting changes in brain function, a process that took place over generations. We now know that epigenetic mechanisms can do so as well, within the lifetime of a single person."

#evolution

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Peirce, Sebeok, and the Semiotic Reformation on Contemporary Communications

At the International Étienne Gilson Society, the latest issue of Studia Gilsoniana includes this article by Maria Asuncion L. Magsino.

SUMMARY
"Language in a broad sense becomes imperative for communication to ensue. Language considered as a system of signs and signification is achieved through a process involving sign relations, e.g. semiosis. Charles S. Peirce’s Theory of Signs can provide a basic framework for the elucidation of the intelligibility of signs. Furthermore, the ability for generating sign processes in an organized manner is determined by what Thomas A. Sebeok designates as an organism’s modeling capacity. Modeling capacities range from primitive to complex, thus generating three orders of language corresponding to language as a Primary Modeling System (PMS), a Secondary Modeling System (SMS) and a Tertiary Modeling System (TMS). This Peirce-Sebeok framework for communication, which John Deely places as 'postmodern,' is premised upon what he designates as the suprasubjective nature of sign relations and their equally suprasubjective function. Thus, Sebeok’s Modeling Theory together with Peirce’s doctrine on the nature and behavior of signs can be used to direct the generation as well as the interpretation of language systems in accordance with the ultimate norm of communication, that is, to reflect truth as an icon of reality."

#language #sign

Monday, May 14, 2018

I learned life-changing lessons from 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'

Tom Clifton looks back, at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
"And the passage that changed my life was at the moment where Huck wakes up early one morning and sees Jim weeping for his family left behind. I remember stopping my reading and thinking long and hard about Jim. And realizing for the first time in my life that everything I had been taught about race was wrong."

Friday, May 11, 2018

The 10 Best Philosophy Books For Beginners

Gregory Sadler with a guest post at Common Sense Ethics.
"There’s one last thing to say before setting out the list. Since we do have available some good volumes that include several works by the same author, I decided to include those under the rubric of 'books' here."

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Is Democracy for Export?

The latest issues of The Great Ideas Online, the Centers weekly, discussed this lecture by Jacques Barzun.

TGIO is emailed to members.

At the Center’s website you’ll find information on how to Become a Member.

#democracy

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Aquinas Leadership International update - May 2018

Peter A. Redpath emails on "some developments related to the Aquinas Leadership International (ALI) group, our affiliate organizations, and other groups interested in ALI’s work."

Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress

20 to 22 July 2018

Immaculate Conception Seminary

Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA

  • Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress Topic
The chief topic for the ALI 20 to 22 July 2018, 5th annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress at the Immaculate Conception Seminary in Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA, will be:
“Artificial Intelligence and the Futures of Philosophy, Global Leadership, and World Peace”
 This World Congress will celebrate the following 7 anniversaries:
10th Anniversary of the founding of the International Étienne Gilson Society (IEGS) at a meeting sponsored by Civitas Christiana, Warsaw, Poland
10th Anniversary of the death of Mieczysław Albert Maria Krąpiec, O.P.
40th Anniversary of the death of Étienne Gilson
50th Anniversary of publication of Jacques Maritain's Peasant of the Garonne
70th Anniversary of founding of the State of Israel
100th Anniversary of the end of World War I
200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankensteinor the Modern Prometheus
This World Congress especially welcomes individual papers, or panels, that relate works of the above-mentioned individuals to the Congress main topic.
If you would like to co-sponsor this meeting, prepare a paper, participate in, or organize, a panel related to the above topics, contact the Congress Chair, Peter Redpath, at: peterredpath@aquinasschoolofleadership.com
Preparation of the Congress program will commence this weekIndividual and panel presentations will be held all day Friday  and Saturdayand Sunday morning until 11:30 AMIf you have already had your paperor panelaccepted for the CongressASAP please contact Congress-Chair Peter Redpath at the e-mail address to indicate your day and time preference for presentation.
The Aquinas Leadership International group is pleased to announce that the American Maritain Association will join our already-existing co-sponsors to help host this meeting!

Friday, May 4, 2018

Possessing Nature: The Female in Frankenstein

Anne K. Mellor at L.A. County High School for the Arts.
"[Anne Mellor’s work in the late twentieth century was instrumental in expanding what had been a very restricted, almost exclusively male Romantic canon to include long-neglected women writers. Romanticism and Feminism, a book which she edited, was the first collection of feminist essays on Romantic literature; the following essay was her own contribution to that book.]"

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Love and knowledge: Emotion in feminist epistemology

Alison M. Jaggar in Inquiry.
"This paper argues that, by construing emotion as epistemologically subversive, the Western tradition has tended to obscure the vital role of emotion in the construction of knowledge. The paper begins with an account of emotion that stresses its active, voluntary, and socially constructed aspects, and indicates how emotion is involved in evaluation and observation. It then moves on to show how the myth of dispassionate investigation has functioned historically to undermine the epistemic authority of women as well as other social groups associated culturally with emotion. Finally, the paper sketches some ways in which the emotions of underclass groups, especially women, may contribute to the development of a critical social theory."

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Du Bois and the Boys' Club of the 'Great Books'

Bill Farrell with an unfavorable review of Great Books of the Western World (2nd ed., 1990) and criticism of Mortimer Adler at Trotter Review.

"Abstract

"During the autumn of 1990 the Encyclopedia Britannica published the Great Books of the Western World, its selection of Western civilization's sixty best works. Newspapers respectfully reported the event. Commentators acclaimed the set's affirmation of Western culture. A scholarly symposium at the Library of Congress celebrated the collection's publication. The National Press Club, usually concerned with major politicians and famous journalists, invited Mortimer Adler, the series editor in chief, to address it.

"In his interviews and public appearances connected with the publication of the series, Adler stressed that to be a great book a work must discuss a large number of the 'great ideas.' But Adler's — and presumably the Britannica editorial board's — criteria present some problems.

"Amid the triumphal hoopla, a few critical voices pointed out that the series contained no books by authors of color. Some suggested that the writings of W. E. B. Du Bois should have been included. (C. L. R. James arguably also merited inclusion.) In response, Adler said that no black American had written a great book. Specifically addressing Du Bois's exclusion, Adler argued that Du Bois's best book was his autobiography, which simply failed to meet the criteria for inclusion in the series.

"A shorter version of the following article first appeared in the September 11-17, 1991, issue of In These Times.

"Recommended Citation
Farrell, Bill (1992) "Du Bois and the Boys' Club of the 'Great Books'," Trotter Review: Vol. 6 : Iss. 1, Article 5.
Available at: http://scholarworks.umb.edu/trotter_review/vol6/iss1/5 "

#education #MortimerAdler

Thursday, April 26, 2018

What Happened to Philosophy between Aquinas and Descartes?

John Deely on John of St. Thomas (John Poinsot) at The Thomist (1994)

"At this moment, we find that a hook translated from the work of the last of the Latin commentators, the Tractatus de Signis of John Poinsot, while receiving no significant treatment within the Catholic intellectual world, is seriously discussed within the international intellectual movement that has grown up in the last quarter century around the study of signs and reviewed in such mass media as the Times of New York, Los Angeles, and London.

"Such a situation participates in improbability. My own view is that The Semiotic of John Poinsot (as the work in question is subtitled in its contemporary edition) is a harbinger of what the postmodern development may prove to be. Postmodernism, in my view, is not to be, as initially appears, a kind of literary/sophistic attempt to eviscerate rational discourse in philosophy through a forced control of signifiers made rather to dismantle (under the mantra of 'deconstruction') than to constitute some text taken precisely as severed from any vestige of authorial intention. Postmodernism in the long run will be seen rather as the term inevitably employed through juxtaposition with the internal dimensions of the classical modern paradigm so as to establish thereby a philosophical sense of a change of age and temper of thought defined historically but able to link contemporary requirements of speculative understanding with late Latin themes omitted from the repertoire of analytic tools developed by modernity." [footnotes omitted]

#sign

Friday, April 13, 2018

Reason and Self-Interest in Hobbes’ Reply to the Fool

Joseph Carlsmith in Prometheus Journal

"ABSTRACT: The Fool offers a famous objection to Hobbesian ethics: if practical rationality is rooted in self-interest, then isn’t it rational to abandon ethical reasoning when doing so “conduces to one’s benefit”? In this paper, I examine Hobbes’ reply to the Fool as it reveals the limitations of the moral theory presented in Leviathan. I begin by sketching out the reply and two traditional ways of interpreting it – the “case-by-case” interpretation and the “rule-commitment” interpretation. I argue that for empirical reasons both these interpretations fail to answer the Fool’s challenge. I then turn to an interpretation that I think a more promising answer to the Fool: Gauthier’s theory of conventional reason. This theory, I argue, contains a crucial insight that the first two interpretations lack: what Hobbes really needs to do to reply to the Fool is not to reconcile covenant-keeping with self-interest, but rather to show how constraints on the pursuit of self-interest can be rationally justified. Gauthier’s attempt to do so within Hobbes’ framework fails, but this failure illuminates a fundamental problem with Hobbes’ moral theory: that moral constraints on the pursuit of self-interest cannot provide reasons to a Hobbesian agent."

#government

Monday, April 9, 2018

Love: Neuroscience reveals all

'Poetry it is not. Nor is it particularly romantic. But reducing love to its component parts helps us to understand human sexuality, and may lead to drugs that enhance or diminish our love for another, says Larry J. Young' in this essay from Nature, at ResearchGate

#love

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Conditions of personhood

Daniel C. Dennett, in Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), The Identities of Persons, University of California Press (1976), at PhilPapers

Friday, April 6, 2018

Aquinas Leadership International Update - April 2018

Peter A. Redpath writes "to update you about some developments related to the Aquinas Leadership International (ALI) group, our affiliate organizations, and other groups interested in ALI’s work."

ANNOUNCING THE
Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress
20 to 22 July 2018
Immaculate Conception Seminary
Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA
●  The Fifth Annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress Topic
The chief topic for the ALI 20 to 22 July 2018, 5th annual Aquinas Leadership International World Congress at the Immaculate Conception Seminary in Huntington, Long Island, NY, USA, will be:
“Artificial Intelligence and the Futures of Philosophy, Global Leadership, and World Peace”
This World Congress will celebrate the following 5 anniversaries:
10th Anniversary of its Founding of the International Étienne Gilson Society (IEGS) at a meeting sponsored by Civitas Christiana, Warsaw, Poland
10th Anniversary of the death of Mieczysław Albert Maria Krąpiec, O.P.
40th Anniversary of the death of Étienne Gilson
50th Anniversary of publication of Jacques Maritain's Peasant of the Garonne
100th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankensteinor the Modern Prometheus
This World Congress especially welcomes individual papers, or panels, that relate works of the above individuals and organizations to the Congress main topic. If you are interested in doing an individual paper or organizing or participating in a panel, contact Congress organizer Peter Redpath ASAP.
If you would like to co-sponsor this meeting, prepare a paper, participate in, or organize, a panel related to this topic, contact the Congress Chair, Peter Redpath, at: peterredpath@aquinasschoolofleadership.com.
The Aquinas Leadership International group is pleased to announce that the American Maritain Association will join our already-existing co-sponsors to help host this meeting!
 The Aquinas School of Leadership (ASL) Announces Formation of the "Aquinas Global Leadership University" (AGLU)
Starting in September 2018, the Aquinas School of Leadership will inaugurate an Aquinas Global Leadership University (AGLU) as a division within its Center for Leadership Coaching. For further information about the AGLU, contact Dr. Peter A. Redpath at: peterredpath@aquinasschoolofleadership.com
● University of South Africa and the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin Thomistic Studies Research Doctoral Programs

The Ontological Problem (the Mind -Body. Problem)

Paul M. Churchland, in Matter and Consciousness: A Contemporary Introduction to Philosophy of Mind, at Amitabha Mukerjee, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur

#mind

Sunday, April 1, 2018

'Enduring Lessons about Happiness from Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas'

Dr. Curtis Hancock presented this Aquinas School of Leadership inaugural lecture at Paradise Valley Community College, Phoenix, Arizona.

There is also >audio of the lecture and the discussion following.

#happiness

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Lon Fuller reviews Adler's 'A Dialectic of Morals'

Lon L. Fuller reviewed A Dialectic of Morals: Towards the Foundations of Political Philosophy by Mortimer J. Adler at The University of Chicago Law Review (1942).

"If there is anything that distinguishes our ethical thinking from that of former times, it is the disappearance of the notion of man's nature. This is the missing constant in our thought. It is the lack of it that explains the relativism which inheres in all our ethical judgments, for without it, no condemnation of evil can carry real conviction. Jefferson and Marshall would never have defined our present differences with the Fuhrer as a choice between different 'ways of life.' They would have said quite simply that Hitler is wrong. They would have said that man cannot make himself a beast of prey without ceasing to be a man, without losing, in other words, his capacity to enjoy what he seeks to obtain through rapine. They would have regarded Mein Kampf not simply as a wicked book, but as a mistaken book."
Recommended Citation
Fuller, Lon L. (1942) "Review of A Dialectic of Morals: Towards the Foundations of Political Philosophy by Mortimer J. Adler," University of Chicago Law Review: Vol. 9 : Iss. 4 , Article 18.
Available at: http://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/uclrev/vol9/iss4/18

(via Chapman University, Leatherby Libraries)

#good #man #nature

Monday, March 12, 2018

“What are the Great Ideas: Why & Where Do They Really Matter?”

That's the disputed question for the 43rd Annual Philosophy/Theology Symposium at Walsh University, North Canton, Ohio. All events are free and open to the public, and will be held in Betzler Auditorium. No registration is required. The 2018 Visiting Scholar is William Cathers, an Aspen Institute Moderator, Philosopher, Educator, and Mortimer J. Adler Protégé.

Program Schedule

Tuesday, March 13, 7:30 p.m. “Great Ideas We Judge By:”
- Truth – Dr. Joe Vincenzo
- Goodness – Dr. Brad Beach
- Beauty – Dr. John G. Trapani, Jr.

Wednesday, March 14, 7:30 p.m. “Great Ideas We Live By:”
- Liberty – Dr. Will Cooley
- Equality – Dr. Koop Berry
- Justice – Dr. Joe Torma

Thursday, March 15, 7:30 p.m. Art Form: “Great Ideas in the Arts:”
- Literature – Dr. Matt Akers
- Painting – Dr. Katey Brown
- Music – Dr. Britt Cooper

Friday, March 16, 7:30 p.m. Visiting Scholar: Lecture #1
- Will Cathers: “The Great Ideas: Objects of Understanding”
- Will Cathers: “A Socratic Seminar with Walsh Students; Teaching the Great Ideas the Way Mortimer Adler Would Have Taught Them”

Saturday, March 17, 9:00 a.m.* Visiting Scholar: Lecture #2
- Walsh Seminar Students: Anne Monnin & Andy Zmecek: “Mortimer Adler and the Biographical History of the Great Ideas”
- Will Cathers: Disputed Question #43: “What Are the Great Ideas; Why & Where Do They Really Matter?
*Special recognition to Dr. John G. Trapani Jr. given by President Richard Jusseaume

(via Charita Goshay at The Canton Repository.)

#idea #truth #good #beauty #liberty #equality #justice #art #education #MortimerAdler